Kingston has kicked things off with another go at the NVMe market and this time they’re

Kingston has kicked things off with another go at the NVMe market and this time they’re doing it with the new KC2000 NVMe PCIe SSD. The Kingston KC2000 lineup is using a Gen 3.0 x4 Silicon Motion SM226EN controller taking the lead on Toshiba’s 96-layer 3D TLC NAND. They’re claiming read speeds up to 3200MB/s and write speeds up to 2200MB/s. The KC2000 is targeting more of the professional and high powered computing markets first while still being a solid option for enthusiast builders and gamers. Security has been all over the news lately thanks to certain chipmakers and is a primary focus on the KC2000 with their 256-bit AES Hardware-based encryption and compatibility with TCG Opal 2.0 security solutions along with built-in support for Microsoft eDrive support. The packaging of the Kingston KC2000 is a bit underwhelming coming in a blister pack rather than a nice box like so many others.  While this surely doesn’t reflect the quality of the product it can be a bit offputting to those who live to collect their boxes for future use, this one will end up right in the trash for most. It does come with a bundled key for Acronis True Image so you can easily replace your existin...

Master bedroom makeover: See the before-and-after transition

Tina Gomez, interior designer at Stellar Design Interiors in Stallings, North Carolina, decided to give her plain master bedroom some major pizzazz with a cool 3D accent wall. “The 3D wall was really a trial and error kind of thing,” she told TODAY Home. “I had been wanting to experiment with 3D panels for some time now and had this crazy idea of adding even more dimensions to them by painting them with two colors.” Gomez used PVC plastic 3D wall panels from Wayfair to get the look, and painted some of the triangles green to give it a fun kaleidoscope effect. While she went into the project thinking it’d be a DIY, she quickly realized the panels were really hard to cut with the tools she had at home. “I tried a utility knife, a saw and electric saw,” she said. But none of them worked, so, she enlisted the help of a local business that deals specifically with these products. “I found that there wasn’t much information online on how to work with this material,” she said, adding that she learned a lot from the installers. “You need a pair of heavy-duty scissors to cut them, and you have to spray paint them to get a smooth finish.” Once the company installed the product and s...