2019 WWE Extreme Rules results, recap, grades: Brock Lesnar cashes in, four title changes

WWE more than held its own in a week filled with professional wrestling, putting on the best special-event card of any promotion on Sunday night in Philadelphia. Extreme Rules showcased top-tier action along with plenty of the company’s typical sports entertainment elements, delivering four title changes and a cash in attempt by Money in the Bank holder Brock Lesnar. With two additional matches added hours before the show and the surprise Lesnar cash in, there were 13 formal bouts held during the event — as many as a typical SummerSlam card rather than a B-level pay-per-view like Extreme Rules. Considering that SummerSlam — WWE’s second-biggest PPV of the year — is just four weeks away and new executive directors are taking over the company’s television programs this week, we are very much left up in the air as to what is planned going forward. As far as what happened Sunday night, CBS Sports was with you the entire way updating this story with results, grades and highlights. Be sure to subscribe to the State of Combat with Brian Campbell podcast for a full breakdown of Extreme Rules and a look at WWE’s weekly TV product on WednesdayR...

Courtesy photoRigging your anchor a certain way can help make it easier to retrieve if it

Courtesy photoRigging your anchor a certain way can help make it easier to retrieve if it gets stuck in the rocks below the water. Courtesy photoRigging your anchor a certain way can help make it easier to retrieve if it gets stuck in the rocks below the water. We had pulled up into the Ipswich River and parked the boat just to the right of the ledges along the shore at the head of Crane Beach. The Danforth anchor was dropped down into the outgoing current. The tide had just turned, so it was not yet really ripping. I payed out about 15 feet of chain and then about a hundred feet of line. I gave it a tug and the anchor held. When it was time to leave, we couldn’t get the anchor out of the boulders into which it had settled. Any other year we would have lost the anchor. But due to the new way we attached the chain to the anchor, it popped out of the hole it was in and came easily to the boat. Rigging it was easy but it did take a little time. The Danforth fluke anchor was invented by Richard Danforth in the 1940s. A West Coast sailor, he was looking for a more stable, easy-to-store, lightweight anchor that would hold in the sand and mud. His invention has several parts. The long ...