Delhi HC to hear PIL on high cut-off for Christian ST students Close

Student bodies, prominent academic raise red flags on move that might have impacted chances of students from region securing admission in St Stephen’s College New Delhi: A couple of days after the prestigious St Stephen’s College in University of Delhi issued a corrigendum on the cut-off marks for Christian students belonging to the Scheduled Tribes (ST), a public interest litigation (PIL) will come up for hearing in Delhi High Court on Friday. The PIL, moved by the former Delhi University Teachers’ Association (DUTA) president and associate professor in mathematics at the college, Nandita Narain, seeks transparency in the admission process by ensuring representation for an adequate number of students from the category during the interview process. Earlier, the 138-year-old college had revised downwards the marks for Christian students belonging to STs after a writ petition was filed by two applicants and three student groups from the Northeast region in the court. Students Worngam Ningshen and Vanlalchhanchhuaha, and student organisations such as Naga Students’ Union Delhi (NSUD), Kuki Students’ Organisation Delhi (KSOD) and North East Students’ Society DU (NESSDU) are petitio...

Report: 73 Percent of Musicians Suffer Mental Illness Symptoms

A new study found that 73 percent of independent musicians reported suffering from mental illness symptoms in the past, while only 19 percent felt the music industry provides healthy working conditions. The stats originated from Record Union, a Swedish-based digital distribution platform that conducted the survey among nearly 1,500 indie musicians from March 21 to April 2, Billboard reported Tuesday (May 7). Record Union’s results surmised that nearly three-quarters of indie musicians have experienced “stress, anxiety and/or depression” in relation to their work. The numbers were worse for younger artists: Among those aged 18-25, 80 percent of respondents said they’ve experienced negative mental health effects rooted in their music careers. “Our study is telling us that something needs to change,” Record Union CEO Johan Svanberg said in a statement provided to Billboard. “It’s time to put the state of our artists’ mental health on the agenda, before streams and commercial success. We as an industry must wake up and ask ourselves: What’s our responsibility in this and what can we do to create a healthier music climate?” ...